Edward Jones Mural-Ted & Pat Jones

Commissioned by Edward Jones for their corporate HQ building, the 160×60″ mural painting commemorates the memory of Ted & Pat Jones.┬áPat said Ted liked to count things; trees, flowers, quail, also financial advisors and the people they advise. At their farm, now the Prairie Fork Conservation Area and the rolling landscape depicted in the mural — they liked to see things grow: numbers and nature. Therefore, it seemed fitting to create a mural for Edward Jones using numbers to reflect and emulate the beauty of nature. Discovered in the Renaissance, the Fibonacci sequence of numbers, 0, 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13… where each number is the sum of the previous two describes a construct of squares. When placed together, the relation of the larger square to the resulting rectangle on its side is the Golden Ratio, and an arc drawn through the squares and the resulting rectangle creates a spiral. Using the Golden Ratio — found in an infinite number of natural structures as the underlying armature for the mural composition — an unconscious sense of balance, proportion and growth suggest to the viewer the relation between numbers and nature.

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Limited edition canvas prints

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Description

Commissioned by Edward Jones for their corporate HQ building, the 160×60″ mural painting commemorates the memory of Ted & Pat Jones.┬áPat said Ted liked to count things; trees, flowers, quail, also financial advisors and the people they advise. At their farm, now the Prairie Fork Conservation Area and the rolling landscape depicted in the mural — they liked to see things grow: numbers and nature. Therefore, it seemed fitting to create a mural for Edward Jones using numbers to reflect and emulate the beauty of nature. Discovered in the Renaissance, the Fibonacci sequence of numbers, 0, 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13… where each number is the sum of the previous two describes a construct of squares. When placed together, the relation of the larger square to the resulting rectangle on its side is the Golden Ratio, and an arc drawn through the squares and the resulting rectangle creates a spiral. Using the Golden Ratio — found in an infinite number of natural structures as the underlying armature for the mural composition — an unconscious sense of balance, proportion and growth suggest to the viewer the relation between numbers and nature.